How Patience and Consistency Can Make You Rich

Man and Clock

Eight and a half years! That is how long I have been on the journey to Financial Independence. The first couple of years were not very effective as I did not have the knowledge and targets to aim for to make the most of it. It can be frustrating at times but I have come to realise that patience and consistency are key to achieving substantial wealth.

At the start point in mid 2012, I effectively had negative net worth as I had blown all my life savings on a BMW. From a distance you would think that the car was an “asset” since it supposedly represents status, wealth and getting ahead in life. However, it turned out to be merely a mode of transport and a liability; worthless since its value depreciated heavily overtime, not to mention countless trips to the garage before eventually getting written off. As a replacement I got back to my senses and acquired a less costly Japanese make vehicle which seems to be the right decision.

55% rule

Fast forward to today, I am nearly 60% financially independent, with a net worth into six figures and growing, no liabilities and trying to avoid ruinous financial decisions as much as possible. Buying the BMW would barely make a dent now but it would still be unwise. It is amazing how a single decision can have a huge impact for years to come.

Central to the strategy is applying the 55% Rule. This is a personal rule where I aim to save an average of 55% of my net income every month. Preferably this amount is invested in low-cost index funds.

Once you aim for the 55% you can manage your life around this, considering optimising things like housing, transportation and food. I use 55% as I estimated that this is what is needed to achieve a base level of Financial Independence in a reasonable period of around 10 years. 

Patience and Consistency

Once you are comfortable with the 55% rule two virtues are required – patience and consistency.

Without patience you will not be disciplined enough to go through with plans and may end up being a victim of lifestyle inflation. Wealth building takes a hockey stick shape over the long term. After a long period of quiescence a sudden sharp increase in wealth is to be expected. This is also often observed in business where success occurs just as those involved are considering quitting. Never underestimate the impact of Compound Interest.

A good tip is to avoid checking your investment portfolio or progress too frequently. A watched pot never boils. A quarterly or annual check in should be enough.

Once you get that out of the way aim for saving and investing a decent amount on a regular basis. With consistency you can more easily make up for any lost opportunities and rectify problems automatically. As an example, working out several times a week while targeting different areas of the body is more likely to achieve results than doing it on and off every few months.

Systems vs goals

Having a good system in place is better than just having goals. James Clear explains this very comprehensively here. If you are goal oriented, once a milestone is achieved you may suddenly stop all the good work you have been doing rather than achieving greater things, especially considering that you would already have place yourself on a platform to achieve greater things.

A goal oriented individual will only be happy momentarily when goal is achieved. But what happens next? Is it not more satisfying to witness your systems and processes working as they should, leading you towards multiple levels of achievement, improvement, refinement and continual progression. Furthermore, systems can yield various good results, rather than the one that you initially envisioned.

Don’t fear the future

On a final note; you should not fear the future or pretend that it does not exist.

Time does not stop moving so you should never stop planning and putting the correct measures in place. I did the opposite when I first started working in the corporate world by completely ignoring my workplace pension during most of my twenties.

I thought that retirement was so very far away so decided to live for the moment. Now I regret this after estimating how much more the pension pot would be worth had I just signed up then. Fortunately now I look forward to making more than average pension contributions while taking advantage of top ups by the employer and government.

So rather than burying your head in the sand, it is useful to always plan for the long term, typically 5 to 10 years ahead since this time will come along anyway. Often sooner than you think!

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1 thought on “How Patience and Consistency Can Make You Rich

  1. weenie

    Well done on the 8.5 years!

    I’m with you on the patience and consistency – I’m 6.5 years into my journey and have slowly built up my wealth with the help of those two ‘virtues’.

    People who aim for ‘get rich quick’ inevitably get disappointed so give up – the fabled tortoise and hare scenario!

    Reply

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