How to give yourself a perpetual pay rise through index investing

Getting a pay rise is the ultimate dream for many workers. How can you get a pay rise without following the usual frustrating processes in the workplace. By taking a different perspective at building and maintaining an investment portfolio it is possible to take the initiative give yourself a pay rise. Even better this can be set up so that it happens perpetually, regardless of what your employer does.

Taking a personal initiative and interest are imperative. This realization came to me as I was sat in a work webinar Q&A session between management and employees.

The general theme was that employees were not happy, and to be honest they are completely powerless about most of the issues raised such as new graduates starting on higher pay than older ones, why pay rises are 2% when profit margins are far larger, who and how one gets a bonus etc.

All this on top of external factors which may affect the company due to the wider economy and a recent corporate takeover of the organisation by a larger competitor which has an unsavoury past. Hence it is important to have control of the situation.

Taking control

The process is not simple as all the traits of pursuing financial independence should be applied, mainly; patience, discipline, frugality and the appreciation that simple arithmetic works.

Like many, I used to wait around to get the bog-standard 2% or so annual pay rise which, at the whim of management, is often distributed with little regard to the employee’s performance. Depending on the industry, some will also get a bonus if they are lucky. This seems to be standard practice for a lot of companies.

At an early stage I realised that this was going to be the likely scenario in the workplace so I decided to take action. Having control over the growth of my net worth meant taking control of my finances, rather than relying on a manager at work using some esoteric means to determine my future.

Taking control meant living within my means, cutting back on unnecessary expenses like motoring, self-educating on business and finance, achieving a 50%+ savings rate and investing in the stock market. Obviously, this approach has not been easy – spending big always seems more attractive than saving.

Dividend growth and investment returns

With the annual growth of Global dividends currently running at 8.5% according to Janus Henderson, it is clear that by holding a sizeable investment portfolio you can grow your income substantially. I would rather have 8.5% than a paltry 2% any day. Coincidentally, this 8.5% growth is not too far off from the long term return of the stock market so we can use it to run a few scenarios:

Suppose you have two workers at the same company who make £40,000 each. Worker A has zero interest in investing or perceives it as “risky” while Worker B is well on their way to financial independence and has been diligently saving and investing for a number of years. Worker A assumes that their pension is secure and someone else’s problem to manage. Their company does not offer bonuses and Worker A is always complaining about how little his pay rises every year therefore feels powerless to do anything about it.

Worker B, however, is not worried at all as his personal financial hacks have unlocked additional income which is unrelated to his employment. Instead of frivolous spending and accumulation of liabilities, Worker B has built a diversified portfolio of stocks and shares, real assets. As an example Worker B has a portfolio of £250,000. Using the typical 8.5% return this means that the portfolio earns an additional £21,250 a year for Worker B, which would be tax-free when invested in an ISA account. As this figure is equivalent to net pay, the worker would need to earn a gross salary of about £26,500 to take home the same amount.

Impact of investment returns on salary

Adding this to their pay we find that Worker B theoretically earns £66,500; substantially more than Worker A and an impressive 66% on top of the standard salary (see above). This would occur at an ever increasing rate every year depending on savings rate. Now that is what I call a pay rise. It is also interesting to note that the investor would easily stealthily grow their income to such a state that they would be better off than other people above their pay grade or other higher paid professions.

These gains would actually be bigger if higher tax rates were considered but that calculation would be a bit complex to do for our example. Gains would vary and may be bigger or smaller depending on yearly market fluctuations but it is important to focus in the long term. When not withdrawn, the gains are unrealized and therefore reinvested to form an ever larger snowball.

Financial Independence – the journey is as important as the goal

This perspective shows that there are multiple benefits to striving for financial independence, even way before the goal is achieved. The greater the savings you have, the more the opportunities which appear to you. It is time to say no to zero or below inflation pay rises. I honestly no longer worry about pay rises or bonuses like I used to when considering the perpetual (and growing) impact an investment portfolio has.

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